Generate Revenue from your e-Newsletter—whether you’re a for-profit or a non-profit organization!



Regardless of your industry or audience, you should be generating revenue from your e-newsletter. Here are a few articles we like that offer great tips on  e-Newsletter Revenue Generation:

  • Tips for Beginners:

http://www.newsletterfillers.com/design/advertising/article.aspx?articleid=%7B71c8ced5-5065-4e0c-9dc8-d3afd2c41aa4%7D

http://extreme-niche-empires.net/2011/08/how-to-use-your-newsletter-to-make-money-online/

  • More Advanced Tips:

http://emailuniverse.com/ezine-tips/?Generate-Ezine-Revenue-With-Google-Adsense&id=880

http://www.pubexec.com/article/how-build-e-newsletter-revenue-circulation-64333/1

http://firstnetbusiness.com/7-ways-to-make-money-using-nothing-more-than-your-list.html

  • Tips for Non-profits:

http://www.evancarmichael.com/Business-Coach/4245/Using-Your-Nonprofit-Organizations-Newsletter-To-Generate-Revenue.html

http://non-profit-forums.org/posts.cgi?1&1&11&384&1&1

 

This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

What Pinterest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design



Potent protection against dull e-newsletter design

You’ve probably heard the latest social media buzz about the Pinterest craze: what started out as a site to bookmark and share recipe, decorating, fashion, and party ideas—mostly among women—has exploded into one of the most popular new social media outlets on the web. While Pinterest’s 12 million unique visitors per month doesn’t even come close to rivaling Facebook’s 167 million—the time spent on the site per visitor (an average of 1 hour and 17 minutes) beats Twitter, Linkedin and Google+ combined. This means that Pinterest is a site to watch as it is significantly driving web traffic and broadening its user base rapidly.

Not just for “ladies’ interests” any longer, Pinterest is now being used by companies as diverse as home builders, such as Brookfield Homes San Diego,  to t-shirt manufacturer Sevenly.

While the site’s potential for corporate promotion is still in its infancy, what is obvious is the instant appeal of Pinterest’s simple and streamlined design. Why not take a hint from this forward-thinking site and incorporate a few of these elements in your next e-newsletter redesign:

  • Chronology is out: Try moving away from Reverse Chronology in your e-newsletter, blog, and website design. While Facebook and Twitter rely on the default organizational style of “newest-to-oldest” when it comes to organizing information, Pinterest’s popularity shows us that alternative modes of organization might just be the wave of the future. This can help great content from feeling “old,” just because you posted it last week and allow you to get more mileage from your most valuable content.
  • Hierarchy is out, Uniformity is in: Part of Pinterest’s appeal is the “flattening” of information that refuses to tell readers what content is most or least important. The site’s style utilizes a uniform post-it style design and size for each “pin” on a user’s board. This creates a streamlined and visually appealing look that many e-newsletters could take a lesson from.
  • Streamlining is in, Clutter is out: How many e-Newsletters have you seen that look like a cluttered mess of indiscernible text? From a design standpoint what is so appealing about Pinterest is its streamlined visual presentation that relies heavily on graphics. The site is not bogged-down by extensive text. Users browse the site visually, then click-thru to other websites to read the details of only the content they want to know more about. Certainly the content of your e-newsletter will be the most important aspect to your readers in the end, but if your design is off-putting readers won’t take the time to discover your content gems. Use streamlined graphics and titles on your e-newsletter’s opening page and save the lengthy text for another layer of your website or blog which your readers can access only after clicking on a “read more” link.

This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your Next E-Newsletter (Part 2 of 2)



Revitalize your content with these healthy and digestible tips

What can we do to spice-up our next e-newsletter while improving reader engagement and retention? Try one of these unique e-content ideas (part 2 of 2):

  1. Responding to Readers’ Posted Comments: We’ve all seen the laundry list of reader comments that often appear following an article. But what happens to these comments? Are the commenters even reading each others’ thoughts, or just spouting off their opinions? If you’ve had a particularly popular article that generated a lot of reader commentary in a previous issue, don’t miss the opportunity to turn that exchange into fresh content. Return to the piece by putting the readers’ comments in dialog and turn your analysis and commentary on their thoughts into a more in-depth look at the previous topic.
  1. Sharables:  Do you have a simple, yet great, tool that might be something your readers could utilize? A checklist? A calendar? A timeline? A budgeting spreadsheet? Quick and handy sharable tools give readers a tangible take-away that will keep them coming back to your e-newsletter in the future.
  1. Video Critique: You know you’ve got to be utilizing video in your e-newsletter to add depth to your content package and capture your reader’s interest—but, have you tried offering a video critique? This gives your e-newsletter the same lift in interest (who can resist clicking on a video just to see if it might be something wildly interesting?), but it also offers the added depth of your insight and critique of the tips and advice out there on the web. You don’t want to waste your readers’ time with a useless video that is easy to tear apart, but you don’t want to just offer up a segment you are in complete agreement with either. Find something that will be of interest to your audience and that you have a compelling response to, and share both the link to the video (or embed it) and your critique with your readers. (A note on embedding You Tube videos: it’s best to get permission from the video’s producer to embed the clip in your e-newsletter. Most people will welcome the publicity, even if you are critiquing their industry tips and advice. If You Tube videos have the “embed” code enabled, it generally means the person posting the video is giving permission for others to embed the video on their site. Another reason to check in with the video’s producer is to make sure that the spot won’t be taken down without in the near future.)
  1. Fiction: Yes, I said fiction. Now the bread-and-butter of most e-Newsletters is information. And fiction is the last thing busy people might be looking for when scanning your e-newsletter for practical, usable information. However, on occasion this can be a segment that works if it’s done well. You have to keep it short, clever, and engaging—and most importantly you have to keep it related to your industry’s interests. So, in the end, it might function as an informational piece, just disguised as a (very) short story with a moral or analogy related to your readers’ interests. This can spice up your e-newsletter while simultaneously delivering industry-appropriate information to your readers. All your marketing department knows how to put together is the cold hard facts? Check with your local university’s creative writing department—aspiring writers will always work for free in exchange for a publishing byline.
  1. Reader Profile: Who is reading your e-newsletter? You and other readers might be surprised. Why not offer up a section that occasionally profiles one of your readers? You can promote this section as a contest to generate quality entries to choose from. The best part is your readers are doing your editorial work for you by submitting their own profiles. In your instructions for the contest, offer a sample profile or a questionnaire to guide their responses and keep them focused on interesting questions about themselves and their relationship to your industry.

Missed Part 1? Find it here! Do you have other fresh content ideas that have worked well for your e-Newsletter? Please send them our way so we can share with our readers and continue to brainstorm together to keep the world of e-Newsletters innovative and exciting! robyn@nichemediahq.com

This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

e-Newsletter of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly is a Master of Audience-Focused e-News and Sophisticated Video Integration



 

 

Pregnancy Weekly is an e-newsletter that gets a lot of the basics right: they send personalized, weekly e-news to expectant moms that addresses them by name and is focused on topics based on what week of pregnancy they’re in; they keep articles short with an abundance of numbered lists of tips, do-s, don’t-s, and top-tens; they maximize their potential audience by targeting not only to pregnant women, but segmenting their audience into preconception, pregnancy, parenting, and grandparents; they also have quick links to their social media sites, and prominent buttons for recommending their e-newsletter to a friend.

Hopefully these are e-newsletter basics that your organization is already utilizing, but two aspects of Pregnancy Weekly’s e-news program that really stand out to us as teachable tools are their use of video integration and their e-newsletter’s audience-focused content, which keeps their own product a secondary focus in their e-news marketing.

Perhaps you’ve thrown in a video spot here and there in your e-Newsletter—but take a lesson from Pregnancy Weekly and try pairing video clips with articles. Along with most major articles on the site PW offers a “View Videos Related to This Topic” link. This gives readers the opportunity to access more in-depth information that is specifically related to a topic of their interest, rather than just offering one random video clip in their e-newsletter. Also, these videos average around one and a half minutes and are preceded by a 25-second, revenue-generating advertisement. Pairing video clips with articles opens up more opportunities for revenue generation and offers your readers more control over their own content experience.

If all this wasn’t enough to make Pregnancy Weekly worthy of our “e-Newsletter of the Month” award—here is the sheer brilliance of this e-newsletter: When you read the fine print to see who publishes PW, you find a company called CBR. And who is CBR? Well, it turns out that Pregnancy Weekly is actually published by Cord Blood Registry. This company’s main business is selling umbilical cord blood banking to expectant mothers. If CBR had a bunch of marketing simpletons on their staff, they might be putting out an e-Newsletter that constantly touted the benefits of cord blood banking over and over each month—but instead, the geniuses at CBR asked themselves this key question before designing their e-newsletter: Who are our primary customers and what information is most important and relevant to them? Then, they generate their content specifically for their audience, while subtly offering contests and ads for Cord Blood Banking that allow them to gather prospects and market their product, while generating revenue from a highly successful e-newsletter.

What’s the lesson we can all learn here? Spend time researching what information your target audience really wants and needs, and make delivery of that content your e-newsletter’s first priority—this might mean shifting your content focus in new and unexpected directions. Then, once you build your audience through quality, audience-focused content, use your e-newsletter to market your primary product or service to your now captive and loyal audience.

This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

e-Toons: “Free Doughnuts”



This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

Email Deliverability Tips and Myths: Part 2 of 2



By Jeanne Jennings
Consultant, Email Marketing Strategy, www.JeanneJennings.com

Last month I provided 2 practical tips for getting more of your email delivered to the inbox and dispelled one widely held myth about deliverability. Today I’ll tackle another myth and provide you two more inexpensive ways to improve your inbox delivery rate.

1.    Tip: Monitor feedback loops

If your email program is business-to-consumer and you (or your ESP) aren’t monitoring your feedback loops, you’re missing an opportunity to gain valuable information about your deliverability.

Most of the major ISPs provide access to feedback loops to legitimate senders. They allow you to get information on spam complaints lodged against you, like the email address of the person that complained and which email they complained about. You should check your feedback loops at least once a month; it’s even better to monitor them after every send.

Ready to get started? Here are links to learn more and apply for feedback loop access (each ISP offers their own feedback loops):

If you’re sending a large quantity of email to other ISPs, a quick search on the ISP’s name and “Feedback Loops” should return a link to learn whether they offer feedback loops and how to apply for access.

2.    Myth: the number of emails sent minus the number of bounces equals your delivery rate

Many email programs report on the quantity of emails sent, the quantity of emails that bounced and the net of the two, which they call “delivered” or “quantity delivered.” This can be misleading.

First of all, email delivered to the junk mail folder, rather than the inbox, would be considered delivered. Second, while some ISPs send a bounce message when an email is filtered as spam, not all do. I’ve had clients with very low bounce rates (resulting in high “delivery” rates reported by the ISP) that are having deliverability issues.

Even if your bounces are low and your reported delivery rate is high, you need to take proactive measures, like those listed here, to protect your deliverability.

3.    Tip: Work to improve your engagement rate

Engagement rate is a new factor being considered for inclusion in the email reputation equation. Basically the ISPs are looking at the percentage of people that open and/or click on your email. The theory goes that a higher engagement rate means your messages are desired by recipients. ISPs do want to filter out spam, but they don’t want to filter out email their customers want to receive.

So how do you improve your engagement rate? One easy way to is to remove non-responsive addresses from your list. I’ve gone through this process with numerous clients. It’s not difficult to do, but few email marketers are doing it.

First, you have to create a definition of a non-responsive address. It will vary based on how frequently you send to your list. If you’re sending just once a month, you might define anyone that hasn’t opened or clicked in the past six months or a year as non-responsive. If you’re mailing on a daily basis, the timeframe may be one to three months.

When I work with clients we first undertake a re-engagement campaign to try to recapture interest. This is typically a multi-effort campaign to these recipients that reminds them of the benefits of the email relationship. Here’s a critique of a re-engagement message I received from the Washington Post, highlighting some strengths and weaknesses of their effort.

This re-engagement email also needs to give the recipients an opportunity to confirm their interest in remaining on the list, update their preferences to increase the relevance of what they receive, or unsubscribe.

As you would imagine, even the best re-engagement campaign will only cause a small percentage (typically 25% or less) of respondents to confirm their interest and/or update their preferences—then you have to decide what to do with those that remain non-responsive.

It’s a best practice to stop emailing these addresses. But that can be difficult to do. At a minimum, you should isolate them from the rest of your list and dramatically decrease the frequency with which you send to them. This way, if they become active in the future you can move them back to the primary list. In the meantime, by limiting the frequency with which you send to them, you will increase your overall engagement rate.

Deliverability is critical to success with email marketing. Things in the deliverability world are changing at a rapid pace and even in this two-part series I’ve only been able to touch on the basics. The bottom line is that you need to be monitoring your deliverability on a regular basis and taking proactive action to maintain or improve deliverability before it becomes an issue.

I hope to see you at the e-Newsletter World Unconference in May, where we’ll talk more about getting your email to the inbox.

This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

Carl’s Capsules: Have you filled out your own contact/subscribe form lately?



If you want a good laugh, try checking out many online contact forms. I’m talking about the forms we have our readers fill out to receive an e-newsletter or even just to ask a simple question. When readers find themselves clicking the dreaded “Contact” link on most companies’ websites, they’re holding their breath and praying they’re not sent to a page-long questionnaire.

As you know, many companies ask people to fill out 6 or 8 fields before they even get to subscribe or send their own e-mail message or question. In most cases the people trying to contact your company are potential customers—why in the world would you make it so difficult? You’re not a bank needing their mom’s maiden name. We might as well be asking for our customers’ blood types while we’re at it before we can let them have the privilege of contacting us.

On the flip side, you do want to ask some questions. When it comes to these online forms, most companies actually don’t ask for enough of the right info. (Sorry, I guess I’m hard to please, but you’ve got to play Goldilocks when it comes to your online forms and get them “just right”—not too long or too short.)

Many companies simply ask for an email address. I think this is a mistake. By gathering only an email address your organization is missing a huge opportunity to gather subscriber data for marketing efforts. We ask for only four things: full name, job title, company name, and email address. Most B2B contacts don’t have a problem providing this info. Obviously, this helps a great deal with personalization and segmentation of your audience.

Okay, forms may not be a hilarious topic, but they are incredibly important to any successful online marketer.

Carl Landau
Grand Poobah

This post is part of our monthly Vitamin E(newsletter) – a newsletter all about e-newsletters. To read more from this month’s e-newsletter:

eDistribution: Email Deliverability Tips & Myths (Part 2)

AntioxiDesign: What Pintarest Can Teach Us About e-Newsletter Design

eContent: 10 Fresh Content Ideas to Perk Up Your e-Newsletter (Part 2)

Carl’s Capsules: Have You Filled Out Your Own Contact/Subscribe Form Lately?

e-News of the Month: Pregnancy Weekly

(r)e-Run of the Month: e-Newsletter Revenue Generation

eToon: Free Doughnuts

eTube: Use Your e-Newsletter to Boost SEO!

A Page Out of the Year Book: Organizing eMarketing



Having multiple internet marketing strategies is important in order to boost audience and sales revenue for your niche publication. However, we understand that having so many internet marketing efforts can sometimes become overwhelming. That is why we have pulled a few tips from our very own Niche Media Year Book to help you get your marketing strategies under control. Check out some tips for controlling your internet marketing efforts:

Niche Media

Check out some tips for organizing emarketing efforts.

  • Measure what matters: One of the first steps you should take when organizing your internet marketing is to take note of what channels are working versus the ones that are not. Take a look at your trends and patterns in your emarketing efforts and look for signs of overall improvement. If you find that a certain channel is working and showing improved results, chances are you will want to keep it around.
  • Think before expanding: Jumping on the latest social media craze can be tempting but sometimes it is not the correct move to make for your niche magazine. Instead of making the decision to expand by adding a new channel of emarketing, first consider optimizing and improving your current channels. This will ensure that you tried new efforts before making a big decision like adding a new emarketing channel.
  • Tie it all together: Instead of using each channel of emarketing separately, it is often best to find ways to mix them together to get better results. Brainstorm new ways of using channels together to boost ad sales and audience numbers. Doing this is also a good way for making your content more noticeable and remarkable.
eMarketing can sometimes be tricky if you are unorganized and unsure of which direction to take it. Be sure to get your efforts under control and have a clear idea of what you would like to get out of it for the best results.

 

 

 

Photo from Free Digital Photos

Finding Inspiring Content Ideas



It’s no secret that sometimes you just hit a wall when it comes to coming up with inspiring content. Whether it be for your print product or online elements, sometimes discovering valuable content can be difficult. If you have ever found yourself struggling with finding inspiring content, you are in luck! We have come across a couple of tips and tricks that should get you back on track in no time, take a peek:

Niche Media

Check out a few places to find inspiring content.

  • Your past work: Just because you had great ideas in the past doesn’t mean some of them still can’t work now. Take a look at some of the past things you have done and brainstorm different ways they can be reworked to be integrated with your current content calendar. You can try to find a new angle to take on the past content or try combining two different past works to come up with a brand new idea.
  • Your conversation starters: Topics that always seem to come up in conversation are also great places to look for content. While some of these topics may not relate to your content strategy, some of them might. Start by taking a look at some of the topics you often find yourself discussing. Then try to find a way in which you relate these topics to your content.
  • Your readers: In addition to looking at your old work and some of your conversation starters, looking at what your readers have to say is also a good way to develop inspiring content. Your readers are probably leaving you feedback that consists of compliments, criticisms and ideas for content they would like to see in the future. Look at what your readers are saying to get a better idea of what sort of content you should be producing.
At times, finding inspiring content ideas can be difficult. However, looking at some of your old work and reader feedback as well as conversation starters is a great way to begin finding valuable content. Where do you find inspiring content? Leave us a comment and let us know!

 

 

Photo from Free Digital Photos