5 Strategies for Getting Advertisers to Commit!



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Super-sell this last quarter so you can soar next year! Here are Carl’s tips on getting advertisers to commit!

ARGH! Is it just me, or are clients just not committing these days?! It’s crazy how far into the year it takes before advertisers are willing to commit to next year’s program. Back in the day, I’d have everything wrapped up for most of next year by now.

Like me, you probably have a TON of prospects you need to contact over the next 2 weeks. The key is ORGANIZING AND PRIORITIZING your calls. Here are some of my tips for keeping clients on track for making solid commitments for next year’s program: [Read more…]

Overcoming a Full Stop “No” in Magazine Ad Sales



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Godin gives us a way to overcome the full stop “no” from advertising prospects.

It’s the New Year, you are on top of your game, your desk is all clean and you are so ready to tackle your 2014 sales goals.

But does everyone seem a bit grumpy?

Post-holiday funk? Maybe.

Seth Godin wisely explains to us why you may have the best presentation in the world, but try as you might, you still can’t seem to overcome the resolute “No” from your advertising prospect. [Read more…]

Avoid These 7 Deadly Sins of Ad Sales Pitching!



Every successful magazine ad salesperson should know by know that sales-pitching is out. Building customer relationships is in. If you don’t know this yet, go back and read Sales Coach Ryan Dohrn’s previous post, Ditch the Sales Pitch. Or read it again to refresh, it’s good stuff.ID-100172662

Inc.com had an entertaining yet informative post about sales presentations and we thought we’d share. (They have really amusing, cartoony images to go with it too, for you creative types.)

Here is an abbreviated version of the 7 Deadly Sins of Sales Pitching:

1) You don’t build suspense. The second your listener says, “I get it,” you’ve lost them. Make your presentation captivating throughout, not just the first 5 minutes.

2) You are too available. Always give a time frame first before presenting. It’s respectful to your client’s time and will make your listeners feel more at ease from the start. [Read more…]